PUBLIC OPINIONS OF THE IMPEACHMENT OF PRESIDENT WILLIAM JEFFERSON CLINTON

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to determine how gender, party affiliation, political views, age, race, education, income, attendance at religious services, and other such variables affected public opinions of President Clinton shortly after the release of the Starr report (and before the impeachment vote in the House of Representatives). Using data from a CBS NEWS / NEW YORK TIMES poll taken from September 12 to September 15, 1998, this study found the following: 1) Age had an effect on opinions concerning the Clinton scandal with younger individuals more likely to want the impeachment process to begin. This information provides some support for the Life-experience hypothesis. 2) Women were more likely to want Clinton to resign and less likely to want impeachment, which is perhaps consistent with the strong support Clinton had from women voters in the 1996 election. 3) Those with more education and income were more likely to want Clinton to resign and less likely to want impeachment, which is consistent with the resource hypothesis. 4) The combination of all attributes and individual characteristics determine how final opinions are established concerning resignation, impeachment, and dropping the matter.

Keywords

Public Opinion, impeachment, President William Jefferson Clinton

How to Cite

Enomoto C. E. & New Mexico State University, (2005) “PUBLIC OPINIONS OF THE IMPEACHMENT OF PRESIDENT WILLIAM JEFFERSON CLINTON”, American Review of Political Economy 3(2). doi: https://doi.org/10.38024/arpe.89

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Carl E. Enomoto (New Mexico State University)
New Mexico State University (New Mexico State University)

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