Economic Law, Ethics, and Paradox

Abstract

The author’s intention is to show that if economics is to become a social science, analysis has to start with the truth of things, continue with the virtue of justice, and end by assigning their rightful places to the approaches of the past 200-odd years: Liberal, Marxist, Austrian, ecclesial and Georgist-Gesellian. The argument hinges on the Land and Money questions, which modern economics persists in not addressing. Hence the rampant economic disorder. The modern State has been rendered impotent by the vested interests that have succeeded in keeping the two questions under wraps. Conventional solutions of economic problems are grossly defective for the same reason. Two men, neither of them an economist, did tackle the problems and solve them: Henry George (1839-97) and Silvio Gesell (1862- 1930). Their solutions: Free Land and Free Money would spell the end of landlordism and usury, thus ending multi-secular oppressions. Oppressors would no doubt put up a stiff resistance.

Keywords

Henry George, Silvio Gesell, Free Money, Free Land

How to Cite

Borruso S., (2005) “Economic Law, Ethics, and Paradox”, American Review of Political Economy 3(1). doi: https://doi.org/10.38024/arpe.82

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Silvano Borruso

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