Push and Pull Factors of Migration

Abstract

Peoples of the Caribbean in general, and Jamaicans in particular, have always been a migratory people. However, over the last 30 years, the emigration rates have increased substantially, with alarming rates in particular, of highly skilled individuals. There are four major factors which emerged in this study and influence this phenomenon: 1. Crime, violence, lawlessness and general societal indiscipline, 2. Occupation and skill mismatch, 3. Lack of economic opportunities, and 4. Lack of social opportunities. This study suggests that both the direct and indirect effects of crime in general and violent crimes in particular, combined with suitable employment for the migrant’s skill set, have forced some members of Jamaica’s professional class to gravitate towards First World countries, taking their skill set which their home country has financed. This places their host country in an advantageous position as these skills contribute to that country’s development and growth. In return, such countries offer migrants secure economic (e.g., skill-career match and ability to afford their desired lifestyle) and social opportunities (e.g., desired health care) currently unavailable in the country of origin.

Keywords

Migration, Economic opportunities, brain drain

How to Cite

Parkins N. C., (2010) “Push and Pull Factors of Migration”, American Review of Political Economy 8(2). doi: https://doi.org/10.38024/arpe.119

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Natasha C. Parkins (The University of the West Indies, Mona)

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This article has been peer reviewed.

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